Lakeside captures lead early to defeat Doyline Panthers 

Lakeside 11, Doyline 1

Doyline Panthers Varsity watched the game slip away early and couldn’t recover in an 11-1 loss to Lakeside Monday. Lakeside took the lead on a passed ball in the first inning.

The Doyline Panthers Varsity struggled to put runs on the board and had a tough time defensively containing Lakeside, giving up 11 runs.

Lakeside got on the board in the first inning. An error scored one run for Lakeside.

Lakeside scored three runs in the fourth inning. Lakeside’s big inning was driven by triples by C.J. Watts and Cade Boley and an error on a ball put in play by Jon Jon Dick.

Cooper Chase earned the win for Lakeside. The ace lasted three and a third innings, allowing two hits and one run while striking out five. Boley threw one and two-thirds innings in relief out of the bullpen.

Noah Spears took the loss for Doyline Panthers Varsity. Spears surrendered nine runs on nine hits over three innings, striking out seven and walking one.

Dakota Stewart, Cayden Mingo, and Spears each managed one hit to lead Doyline Panthers Varsity.

Lakeside collected 13 hits on the day. Watts, Dick, Eli Musgraves, Jordan Isbell, Bradley Dick, and Boley all managed multiple hits for Lakeside.

Information: Powered by Narrative Science and GameChanger Media


A wayward camel, the NCAA and Dolly: Tupperware Tales, Chapter 5 

 Table scraps …

From the “You Really Aren’t Having A Bad Day” Files: It’s been nearly two weeks since several news services reported that two men at a Tennessee farm were killed by a “rampaging camel.” The farm housed several kinds of animals and no reason was given for the camel’s rampage. The bottom line is that, if you get attacked by a camel, and in Tennessee of all places, it ain’t your day …

A baseball team I follow has some long bus trips so I suspected it would be thoughtful and different to get them some playing cards along with some silly things, games children play with like Etch-A-Sketches and a magnetic checker set and some Wooly Willy drawing games, the ones where you put the “magic wand” against the plastic and it pulls little slivers of iron where you want them to go so you decorate the face of Willy. And then I thought how that was the stupidest idea I’d ever had — and it’s a long line — because all these dudes do is play on their phones and listen to music. Would have been a great idea — in the mid-80s …

Can’t give you the link here ’cause we don’t want you jumping to another site BUT in honor of these first days of spring, take 30 seconds and find “Welcome, Sweet Springtime: The Andy Griffith Show” on YouTube or the site of your choice and listen to Barney, very flatly, usher in the new season. Good ol’ 14A in your songbook. Never gets old …

To paraphrase Kris Kristofferson, my NCAA Tournament Bracket woke up Sunday morning with no way to hold its head that it didn’t hurt. Over the span of 48 hours, from the Opening Round of the NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament through Saturday of the Second Round, my little black-and-blue bracket went from “tightness in the joints” to “full body cast.” …

BUT … to paraphrase singer-songwriter Travis Tritt, “Here’s a quarter, call someone who cares.” Because no one cares about your NCAA bracket. No one but you cares that you had Kentucky and flamed out on ascent or that you pulled a rabbit out of the hat and picked St. Peter’s. No one even cares if your bracket is leading in any of the groups you have joined, because everyone knew SOMEbody was going to win — somebody besides them. Nobody knows the trouble your bracket has seen — but nobody gives the slightest rat’s rip either. If it makes you feel any better, anything your bracket can do, mine can do worse. We might be enjoying the first days of spring, but it remains a cold, cold world. (Just ask anyone who’s been attacked by a camel, hard by the Tennessee River) …

Speaking of hoops, one good thing that’s come from the pandemic is that very few men’s basketball coaches wear coats and ties on the sidelines anymore. They dress down. They used to look like they were going to call time out, then take up offering. Most women’s coaches still dress up for games, but for them, dressing down is still dressing up when compared to guys. We like to think we’re dressed up if we have our shoes tied …

Country Music Hall of Famer and perpetual wonder woman Dolly Parton has teamed with bestselling author James Patterson to write a climbing-the-charts mystery, “Run, Rose, Run,” a novel about a young female singer with hopes to make it big, but a secret from her past might destroy her. I’m good as long as the secret isn’t that she killed Porter Wagoner …

For all you Bracket Folk, good luck this weekend in the Sweet 16 (and no, do NOT tell us who you’ve picked; it’ll save us both the embarrassment).

And, if at all possible, stay away from camels: any one of them might have picked Kentucky or Wisconsin to win it all and be in a surly mood.

Welcome, Sweet Springtime.

Contact Teddy at teddy@latech.edu


Nine days of Spain in 1,182 words 

Robert St. John and Simeon Avery Williford

By Robert St. John

SEVILLE— Nine days into this Spanish deep-dive, I find myself sitting in the front jump seat of a tour bus typing on a borrowed laptop because my laptop is in the possession of a sneaky thief who swept my backpack up in a hotel lobby in Valencia. I have preached over and over to my guests about holding onto their purses and wallets at every turn. I got caught in a moment of trying to solve a guest emergency and was off my game for just a second. But that’s all it took, a lone second.

Nevertheless, I will purchase another laptop when I get to the Apple store in Florence in a few days. I’ve got a job to do, and I intend to see it through.

I host groups in Europe. Mostly Italy, but some in Spain, now. I’ll be over here three months in 2022. I’m not a tour guide. I’m a host. I find great places and then turn people on to them. I hire others along the way— professionals— to help in all manner of ways.

My group and I have covered a lot of ground in the past eight days. The trip started in Madrid, and after a few nights moved to Barcelona, then to Valencia for the Fallas. When this tour was originally booked in 2020, we were to head to Cordoba on the fast train and then to Seville. Post-Covid the fast train route was closed and so I was forced to decide to load 25 people on a slow train or a bus and spend more than half a day couped up, or to look for a better option. It was an easy decision.

I booked flights for all of us to the island of Mallorca where we had a world-class meal and a great visit and then flew into Seville later that evening. We spent two nights in Seville and are now headed to Gibraltar for the day and will spend our final two nights on the Mediterranean in the beautiful coastal city of Malaga where my family and I spent Christmas in 2011.

At this point it’s probably a good idea to do an informal recap hitting the highlights, lest I forget what we’ve done during this whirlwind of a tour.

My wife and I found a great Irish Pub in Madrid and hit it up twice before the tour officially began. I am a firm believer in the when-in-Rome philosophy, but I knew we were about to do a very deep dive into Spanish cuisine and culture, so I wasn’t worried too much about keeping it pure before the guests arrived. We met Matthew, an expatriated Irishman who has been running The James Joyce Irish Pub (possibly the best name ever for an Irish pub) for years. It was the real deal and was the perfect start before our Spanish sojourn.

In addition to everything on our itinerary, there were a couple must-dos on my list for my guests — one was to take them to eat paella at 7 Portes — a place where I had eaten the best paella of my life a little more than a decade earlier. It happened to be my wife’s birthday, and the atmosphere was festive. Our group of 30 shared a room with another group of a similar size from California. The meal was excellent. Though the paella was probably the fourth best dish we ate. I don’t know if I have romanticized their version over the years or if they were just off their game due to so many large parties — understandable. We sang “Happy Birthday” twice. The group from California thought my wife’s name was Cheryl. It’s Jill (the southern drawl was lost in translation).

Our second dinner was one I have been looking forward to even longer than 7 Portes. On the six-month long 2011 family trip we visited Barcelona two separate occasions . While there, I broke my rule of only visiting a restaurant once during an out-of-town or overseas visit. The point is to get as many places in as I can. Tapeo is a place I fell in love with and visited more than a half dozen times during both of those Barcelona visits. I made friends with the chef-owner, Daniel, Rueda and have since sent hundreds of people there. Though I hadn’t returned … until a couple of nights ago. 

At the end of December, I compiled a list of my top 10 dining experiences throughout the year. I think I have probably already dined in four of this year’s entries in a six-day period. Tapeo may be tops. I’ve spent a good bit of time in Spain, and I have eaten tapas across this country. I have yet to eat any that come close to every meal I have eaten at Tapeo. Rueda’s patatas bravas and his spareribs are unmatched and are in the rare category of culinary perfection. He is a master. I need an entire column to give him his due. That will come at a later date.

The next day I was able to check an item off my bucket list as I led the group to a second-story apartment — far from the madding crowd — where we had fully catered with full-bar view of the Valencia Square as we watched over 150,000 people celebrate Las Fallas and witnessed the parade after.

The next day’s lunch on Mallorca might have been one of the most popular meals I’ve ever hosted over the past few years and more than 400 guests fed. It was above the market and cooked entirely in a coal-fired Jasper oven. The dessert, an ensaimada — a classic in Mallorca — was otherworldly (I never use that adjective, but it applies here) and is also deserving of an entire column — or two — in the future. Google it in the meantime.

Back on that long family trip in 2011, my son and I visited the small town of Jabugo, which is fully focused on producing one specific food product — the best ham I the world — jamon Iberico. I gave our guests the option to take a city tour of Seville or to visit a farm and walk through the entire process from the Iberian pigs eating acorns under the cork trees to the curing process. I led the farm group which ended in a jamon Iberico tasting and a lunch that included the absolute best pork dish I have ever eaten.

So we’re headed to Gibraltar to dine, visit the World War II caves and hope we don’t get harassed too badly by the moneys on top. Tomorrow we’ll dine in another restaurant I have had on my got-to-get-back-to-that-place-one-day list where we spent a fine Christmas Eve dinner years ago.

This group has been a true joy with which to travel. They have waited two years, and I am sure many doubted the tour would ever take place after two reschedulings. But we are all having a blast, eating way too much, laughing much too loud, while having the journey of a lifetime.

Onward.

TAPEO RIBS

INGREDIENTS
10oz pork ribs in strips
1 Bay leaf
1½ Teaspoons of black pepper
2 cloves of garlic
1 Tablespoon of salt
2 Teaspoons of honey
1 tablespoon of wholegrain mustard
1 Tablespoon of Sherry vinegar

PREPARATION

Separate the individual ribs. Put the ribs and the rest of the ingredients in a sous-vide bag. Cook slowly at 175°F in the bain-marie for 12 hours.

Take the ribs out and sear them on a griddle pan until they are well browned all over.

Put 2 teaspoons of honey and 1 teaspoon of mustard in a frying pan, wait until they start to caramelize, and then add the ribs and toss them.
When they are the desired color, stop the cooking by adding the vinegar. Let the vinegar evaporate and set up.

(Robert St. John is a chef, restaurateur and cookbook author who lives in Hattiesburg, Miss.)


Clear the Stage 

When was the last time you were deeply touched by a song? The lyrics were so meaningful to you in that moment that you stopped what you were doing to just listen over and over again. Music has a way of speaking to our hearts and often times, it can bring us to our knees.

“Clear the Stage” is a song that I first heard at a women’s conference years ago, and I was so moved by it. I heard it again recently for the first time since that conference and it brought me to tears. During this Lenten season I have been sitting in my brokenness with God more intentionally. It isn’t easy to confront the ugliness of our lives. We would rather just ignore it or sometimes even try to blame it on someone else. Confession and repentance are hard and holy work that we all must do if we want to deepen our relationship with God. This requires us to be honest and name the real in our hearts before our forgiving and loving Father.

The song, “Clear the Stage,” is about the idols (gods) in our lives. They will look different for all of us, but we all have them. Modern day idols can be our family, pride, money, status, material things, attitudes, worries and more. They take up space on the stage of our lives and often leave no room for God.

The Scriptures speak to these concerns about idols.

Exodus 20:3 “You shall have no other gods before me”

Colossians 3:2-5 Set your minds on things above, not on earthly things. For you died, and your life is now hidden with Christ in God. When Christ, who is your life, appears, then you also will appear with him in glory. Put to death, therefore, whatever belongs to your earthly nature: sexual immorality, impurity, lust, evil desires and greed, which is idolatry.

I know that I have allowed the world, circumstances and my own pride to keep me from taking a break to sit with the Lord in all of my brokenness and sin. This song was a good reminder that we need those times in our lives to do just what the songs says:

Take a break from all the plans that you have made and sit at home alone and wait for God to whisper. Beg him please to open up his mouth and speak and pray for real upon your knees until they blister.
Shine the light on every corner of your life until the pride and lust and lies are in the open. Then read the Word and put to test the things you’ve heard until your heart and soul are stirred and rocked and broken.

God is waiting and watching from the backstage. He sees our idols, he wants us to lay them down, and through His Spirit he will help us. But, until we do he cannot take centerstage where he belongs.

What’s on your stage? Who or what is taking the spotlight? When was the last time you spent some time with the Lord until you were broken for your sins? Scripture tells us what happens when we do:

John 1:9 If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.

I hear people saying that this world needs Jesus and I agree, but it starts with each of us as individuals returning to the Lord in prayer, fasting, confession and repentance. What better time than today to begin? What is holding you back? Ask the Lord to help you and he will. Ask the Lord to reveal what you are hiding in the corners of your heart. He will not shame you or condemn you, for He is faithful and just to forgive. He is always ready and waiting to offer us His forgiveness. What are you waiting for? Clear the stage.

Your fellow sinner saved by grace, Jennifer Thomas


Snyder to speak at Lions Club

Guest speaker for Thursday’s noon meeting of the Minden Lions Club will be Brook Snyder, facility administrator of Town and Country Health & Rehab in Minden. She is a Louisiana Tech University graduate (2004-Sociology and 2017-Nursing).

Brook’s career in long-term care spans 18 years. She began as a social services director and, in 2009, obtained her administrative license. Brook also has experience in ICU med/surgery, psychiatric health, and marketing. She was hired at Town and Country in 2020.

The Minden Lions Club meets Thursdays at noon at the American Legion Memorial Home, located at 119 Pine St. in Minden.


Complimentary Social Security retirement benefit analysis 

While retirement planning isn’t just about saving.  It isn’t just about tax planning.  Social Security effects almost everyone. 

Statistics show approximately 90% of those currently receiving Social Security did not maximize their benefits.  Current regulations allow for close to 300 options for a married couple to draw these benefits.  What is the right answer for you?  Begin drawing early?  Wait, but to what point to gain the most dollars?  Can you still work and receive Social Security? Some of the answers to these common consumer questions may surprise you.

 If you are a Louisiana state employee or a public educator, you and your spouse both maybe adversely effected by the Windfall Elimination Provision (WEP) or Government Pension Offset (GPO)?  Both WEP and GPO reduce the Social Security benefits you actually receive each month.  What you don’t know really can hurt you. 

 An informed decision is always a better decision.  Call for your own complementary Social Security retirement benefit analysis and personal consultation to select the best option for you and your family!

Contact Reinette Today! 

rfoster@reinettefoster.com

318-481-6539

www.ReinetteFoster.com


Upcoming Events 

March 26

9 a.m. until 1 p.m., NWHS Baseball Mini-Camp at NWHS baseball field on Stateline Rd. Deadline to register: March 18. Call or text 318-578-2359.

6 p.m. The Perrys at CAC Building, Springhill.

March 29

10 a.m. until 2 p.m. Job and Career Expo at NLTCC, 9500 Industrial Dr., Minden.

March 31

6:30 p.m. “Be the Calm in the Chaos,” A discussion on serving those who are suffering, sponsored by WHO of North Webster, Springhill Medical Center and First Baptist Church of Springhill. The event will be held at FBC, Springhill. Speaker: Morgan Grantham.

April 2

10 a.m. until 2 p.m. Wings & Wheels Fly-In & Car Show at Minden Airport.

April 4-7

8:30 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. school bus driver training course for Webster Parish Schools. Site is Harper Pathway to Excellence Center, 618 Germantown Rd., Minden. For more information, call 318-377-7052 for Jeff Franklin.

April 5

Greater Minden chamber’s Annual Awards Gala, celebrating 80 years. Presented by Minden Medical Center.

April 15-17

Spring Highway 80 sale between Minden and Dixie Inn.

April 21

10 a.m. until 1 p.m., Senior Fun Day for ages 50 and older. Vendor booths, games, door prizes. Springhill CAC Building. Sponsored by Springhill Medical Center. Free admission; free lunch sponsored by Regional Hospice.

April 23

Piney Hills Master Gardeners Annual Green Thumb Jamboree. Plant sale, vendors, food truck and activities for the kids. Vendors of all kinds contact Marilyn Bunton at 318-299-0137

April 30 & May 1

7 a.m. both days, Minden Evening Lions Club will be hosting a garage sale fundraiser at the Minden Fairgrounds field. They are taking donations now if you have anything you’d like to contribute to help them raise funds you can contact Sherrie McMurray at 294-6346, Dru Brown at 272-2467 or Tommy McMurray. 

May 7

9 a.m. until 4 p.m. Tradition with a Twist Quilt Show presented by Piney Needles Quilt Guild. South Main Mall, Springhill. Free admission.

  • If you have a non-profit event: church, school or community, please email it to wpjnewsla@gmail.com.* Webster Parish Journal reserves the right to determine if a calendar item is a paid advertisement.

Weather tips keep boaters safe

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Enforcement Division wants to remind boaters to be mindful of the weather as they plan and carry out boating excursions.

Louisiana has already seen four fatalities and three rescues so far in 2022 on large lakes where weather and conditions reportedly changed quickly. Vessels were capsized, swamped or submerged as a result of abrupt weather changes. Boarters should always make themselves and their crew aware of all potential dangers that could occur during an outing.

Before departure, always check the Marine forecast to see if there will be any significant changes in weather conditions while on the water. A boat’s size, range and current running condition should also be taken into account. This, and weather reports, should help boaters determine if it’s safe to take a boat trip or if adjustments need to be made.

“It is the responsibility of the operator to decide to continue or make adjustments to the trip,” said Maj. Clay Marques, Boating Law Administrator for Louisiana. “No matter the boater’s skill or capability level, weather changes can be rapid and can quickly turn a fun situation into a dangerous one. At the end of the day, we want every boater to enjoy their experience and return home safely.”

If a boater is on the water and a thunderstorm approaches, ensure all occupants are wearing their properly-fitted life jackets and head toward the nearest safe shore. Weather such as strong winds, storms, lighting and fog can cause dangerous situations even on static waters with little or no current or tide movement.

Various apps are available on most smart phones that can provide warnings of approaching weather and provide boaters with the best information to make decisions. VHF radioes also have alerts.

LDWF agents are tasked with recreational boating safety for the state. Agents encourage all citizens to take the free safe boating education course that is also mandatory for anyone born after Jan. 1, 1984. To register, visit the LDWF boater education website.


The meat packer’s nickname  

Samuel Wilson was born in 1766 in Arlington, Massachusetts, then one of the North American colonies of the British Empire.  Tension between the mother country and the American colonies was a topic of discussion in the Wilson home even before Samuel was born.  In 1765, the year before Samuel Wilson was born, the Parliament of Great Britain imposed a direct tax on the American colonies.  The Stamp Act required almost all printed materials including legal documents, newspapers, magazines, and even playing cards, to have an embossed revenue stamp.  Printed materials not containing the revenue stamp were contraband and deemed illegal.  More taxes and other forms of control followed including the Townshend acts, the Tea Act, Intolerable Acts, and the Quebec Act.  The situation had reached a boiling point, and in February of 1775, nine-year-old Samuel’s home state was declared to be in a state of rebellion.  Two months later, large-scale fighting erupted at the Battles of Lexington and Concord.  

Samuel wanted to do his part, but he was too young.  The fighting continued for six long years when, in March of 1781, fourteen-year-old Samuel joined the Continental Army.  As a young soldier, most of Samuel’s responsibilities were focused on the Army’s cattle, their main supply of fresh meat.  He mended fences, made sure the cattle were healthy and properly fed, and slaughtered and packed the meat for transportation.  One of his most important duties was to guard the cattle against enemy saboteurs.  It was common for enemies to steal or poison an enemy’s cattle as well as their supply of meat. 

The War for Independence ended in October of 1781 when Cornwallis surrendered at the Siege of Yorktown.  Following the war, Samuel and his brother moved to Troy, New York where they operated several successful businesses.  In 1793, drawing on his experience in meat packing, Samuel and his brother, Ebenezer, opened what became a profitable meat packing business under the name of E & S Wilson on the Hudson River.  Company profits increased when Samuel and his brother built a loading dock for ships on the river. 

In June of 1812, America clashed with the British again in what is called the War of 1812.  The United States Army was again in need of fresh meats.  Samuel’s company received a one-year contract to supply 2,000 barrels of pork and 3,000 barrels of beef to the Army.  When the contract expired, the Army appointed Samuel as meat inspector to ensure the meats were fresh and properly packed.  He stamped each barrel of meat with a company insignia and the letters “U.S.” for United States.  Soldiers in New York, many of whom were from the Troy area, recognized the company’s insignia and knew the meat had been inspected by Samuel.  Local soldiers proudly nicknamed the U.S.-stamped barrels of meat after Samuel.  Word quickly spread throughout the ranks and the nickname evolved to include anything which displayed the U.S. stamp.  Samuel Wilson, a man who ensured that American soldiers received fresh, safe meat during two wars, was the origin of the image of a man which represents the United States itself.  Because Samuel stamped each barrel of meat with “U.S.”, and because of the nickname the soldiers called him, on September 15, 1961, the United States Congress adopted the following resolution: “Resolved by the Senate and the House of Representatives that the Congress salutes [Samuel] Wilson of Troy, New York, as the progenitor of America’s National symbol of Uncle Sam.”

Sources:

1.  “United States Nicknamed Uncle Sam.” History.com. A&E Television Networks, November 24, 2009. Last modified November 24, 2009. Accessed March 20, 2022. https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/united-states-nicknamed-uncle-sam.

2.  “Uncle Sam.” Visit the Main Page. Accessed March 20, 2022. https://www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Uncle_Sam.


Forward-Facing Sonar … is it ethical? 

 Since the first-time man ever wet a hook, he has always looked for an advantage, a way to figure out the best way to catch fish. Bass anglers especially have been obsessed with trying to find and locate bass in all kinds of water clarity. But today, anglers have access to fish finding instruments that can read the date on a dime in 30 feet of water. I really believe you could navigate to Mars with the electronics anglers have on their boats today. Tournament anglers are spending $15,000 on their fish finding units for the sole purpose of catching bass. Not all tournament anglers can afford this, and it’s created a major advantage for those who can. It’s a case of the haves vs. the have nots. Tournaments are being won on a weekly basis with these forward-facing sonars.  Due to these advancements, it’s no longer a level playing field. Which brings up the question…. Is it ethical? Have we made bass and crappie fishing too easy? Will this come back to bite anglers after a few years of using these high advanced fish locating devices?

To understand how far sonars have come, let’s first go back to the late 1960’s with an instrument known as a flasher. This device was what started the electronics revolution. It was a round digital sonar that registered the depth and showed anything between the bottom and the surface with a red flashing line. Just like any electronic device that’s new, these were not cheap and only anglers with deep pockets could afford one of these. 

Then came the paper graph. Now this was truly cutting-edge technology that came out in the early 70’s. This unit would print out a paper copy of the contour of the bottom and show fish suspended and even along the bottom. You could see stumps, trees, and underwater grass. It was a true mapping of the entire water column. Anglers would take these printed copies and keep them on file for use in future events.

During the 1980’s, sonar became the craze of the fishing world as companies like Humminbird unleashed their LCR (Liquid Crystal Recorder) which was so advanced it was scary. This revolutionized the marine industry with its detailed structure, zoom capability, sensitivity control, high speed tracking, waterproofness, and a screen you could actually see in the bright sunlight, which was a big problem for earlier sonars. 

Now fast forward to today with what Garmin calls “Livescope” and Lowrance calls “Active Target Live.” Garmin was the first to come out with this new forward-facing sonar. A unit that allows you to see fish up to 60 or 70 feet in front of your boat live and in real time. Now THIS is a game changer!!! Anglers now cannot only see fish swimming, but when they bite the lure. It’s basically a video game on the front of your boat!!! If you do not have this level of electronics on your boat today, you’re probably fishing for 2nd place.  

But this level of technology has raised questions and has become a hot topic for anglers across America. Some want it banned and think it should not be allowed in tournament competition. They think it gives anglers an unfair advantage. But they would be wrong. No matter what device is ever invented, there’s been nothing that will make fish bite a lure. Even looking at fish on a screen does not guarantee success. Anglers still must figure out a way to trigger fish into biting. But forward-facing sonar does help to locate fish a lot quicker and it allows anglers to zero in on larger fish. 

From an angler’s perspective, forward facing sonar (Garmin’s Live Scope) just might be the greatest invention the fishing industry has ever seen. Once again, from the first-time man has ever wet a hook, he has always looked for a way to make it easier to find and catch fish. This will never change and when it comes to technology, there is no telling what lies ahead with regards to the fishing industry. Till next time, good luck, good fishing and don’t forget to set the hook!

Steve Graf

Daiwa/SPRO Pro Staffer


Notice of Death – March 22, 2022 

Carol W. Hooter

August 25, 1947 – March 20, 2022

Visitation: 1:30 p.m. until service time Thursday, March 24, 2022 at Springhill United Pentecostal Church, Springhill

Funeral service: 3 p.m.

Burial: Cotton Valley Cemetery

Eddie Louis Starr

Oct. 26, 1953 – March 21, 2022

A private memorial will be held at a later date

Bailey Funeral Home, Springhill

Peggy Joyce Beaird Poole

Oct. 26, 1942 – March 18, 2022

Funeral service: 1 p.m. Wednesday, March 23, 2022, Bailey Funeral Home, Springhill

Burial: Liberty Baptist Cemetery, Spearsville

Martha Jane Gardner Gahagan

Sept. 30, 1934 – March 18, 2022

Visitation: 10 a.m. Wednesday, March 23, 2022 at First Baptist Church, Coushatta

Funeral service: immediately following visitation at 11 a.m.

Burial: Social Springs Cemetery

** Webster Parish Journal posts paid obituaries – unlimited words and a photo, as well as unlimited access – $80. Contact your funeral provider or wpjnewsla@gmail.com . Must be paid in advance of publication. (Above death notices are free of charge.)


Early voting becomes popular

By Bonnie Culverhouse

Early voting came to a close in Webster Parish at 6 p.m. Saturday for the March 26 election with at least 1,462 voters casting their ballots.

“Those numbers include north and south Webster and all of the mail-in ballots,” Webster Parish Registrar Angela Hall said Monday. “But that’s also before today’s processing.”

Hall said there is no doubt early voting is becoming more popular as time passes.

“Even though there was a conversation about low voter turnout during Covid, that was not the case for early voting, even during Covid,” she said. “It has continued to increase as the years go by.”

Webster Parish voters have very little on the ballot this Saturday.

“Allie” Aiello Stahl, who lists a Bossier City address, and “Doug” Stinson, who is from Benton will be on the March 26 ballot. 26th Judicial District Court covers Bossier and Webster parishes.

According to the Webster Parish Registrar of Voters Office, Evergreen Fire Protection District is having a millage renewal during this election.

“In lieu of a millage election, Springhill Fire Protection District No. 11 was given permission by the State Bond Commission to authorize the levy of a special tax variance,” said Denise Weeks, assistant Registrar of Voters.


Webster Parish School teams play well

Teams, scores and recaps provided by GameChanger

March 17

Lakeside Warrior 12, Fluke Panthers 2

Lakeside Varsity Warriors scored eight runs in the fifth inning, on its way to a 12-2 victory over Fluke Panthers Thursday. The offensive onslaught came from singles by C.J. Watts, Jake Wilkins and Jordan Isbell, a walk by Watts, a sacrifice fly by Cooper Chase and a double by Bradley Dick.

Lakeside tallied 11 hits in the game. Dick, Eli Musgraves and Watts had multiple hits. Watts, Musgraves and Dick collected two hits to lead the Warriors. Watts had the most chances in the field with six. Cade Boley led Lakeside with three stolen bases.

Dutchtown 7, Glenbrook 4

Glenbrook Apaches lost the lead late in a 77-4 defeat to Dutchtown Thursday. The game was tied at four with Dutchtown Griffins batting in the bottom of the fifth when Pierson Parent singled on a 2-2 count, scoring one run.

Glenbrook lost despite out-hitting Dutchtown eight to five. Maddox Mandino took the loss for Glenbrook. The hurler surrendered five runs on four hits over five innings, striking out nine. He also hit a homer in the fifth inning.

Glenbrook tallied eight hits on th eday. Landry Powell and Easton Sanders managed multiple hits for Glenbrook. Sanders and Powell each collected two hits.

North Webster Knights 12, Bradley 7

An early lead helped North Webster Knights Varsity defeat Bradley 12-7 on Thursday. North Webster Knights Varsity scored on a single by Sawyer Wages in the first inning, a walk by Judd Wesson in the first inning, a walk by Collin McKenzie in the first inning, a error during Kyle Dinkins’s at bat in the first inning, a wild pitch during Mason Haynes’s at bat in the first inning, and a single by McKenzie in the second inning.

North Webster Knights Varsity collected four hits and Bradley had ten in the high-scoring affair.

Wesson led the North Webster Knights Varsity to victory on the hill. The hurler lasted six and two-thirds innings, allowing ten hits and six runs while striking out five. Jace Wesson threw one-third of an inning in relief out of the bullpen.

Wages led North Webster Knights Varsity with two hits in four at bats.

Bradley totaled ten hits. Aiden Stewart, Duke, and Landon Hall all collected multiple hits for Bradley. Stewart went 3-for-4 at the plate to lead Bradley in hits. Bradley tore up the base paths, as two players stole at least two bases. Jackob Janeczko led the way with two.

Zwolle 9, Doyline Panthers 0

Doyline Panthers Varsity watched the game slip away early and couldn’t recover in a 9-0 loss to Zwolle on Thursday. Zwolle scored on a double by B Ebarb in the first inning, a single by K Etheridge in the first inning, a error in the first inning, a error in the second inning, and a sacrifice fly by A Lewis in the second inning.

The Doyline Panthers Varsity struggled to put runs on the board and had a tough time defensively containing Zwolle, giving up nine runs.

Zwolle opened up scoring in the first inning. Ebarb drove in one when Ebarb doubled.

One bright spot for Doyline Panthers Varsity was a single by Austin Arbaugh in the fourth inning.

Cayden Mingo took the loss for Doyline Panthers Varsity. The righty allowed six hits and nine runs over five and a third innings, striking out three.

Arbaugh led Doyline Panthers Varsity with one hit in two at bats.

Zwolle totaled six hits in the game. A Cartinez and C Williams all collected multiple hits for Zwolle.

Minden Crimson Tide 15, Bearden 0

Jakobe Jackson shut down Bearden, throwing a complete game shutout and leading Minden Crimson Tide Varsity to a 15-0 victory on Thursday

Minden Crimson Tide Varsity got on the board in the first inning. Andrew Cooper drove in two when Cooper doubled.

Minden Crimson Tide Varsity notched six runs in the third inning. Landyn Huddleston, Brandon Winston, Price Miller, Cooper, and Brody Bower powered the big inning with RBIs.

A single by Finley in the third inning was a positive for Bearden.

Jackson earned the win for Minden Crimson Tide Varsity. The pitcher surrendered zero runs on two hits over five innings, striking out ten and walking zero.

Minden Crimson Tide Varsity tallied 19 hits on the day. Winston, Cooper, Miller, Jackson, Elliott Sheppard, and Bower each had multiple hits for Minden Crimson Tide Varsity. Jackson, Miller, Cooper, and Winston each managed three hits to lead Minden Crimson Tide Varsity. Minden Crimson Tide Varsity was sure-handed in the field and didn’t commit a single error. Cooper had the most chances in the field with eight.

Bearden was sure-handed and didn’t commit a single error. Young made the most plays with three.

March 18

North Webster Knights 17, Bearden, 4

North Webster Knights Varsity scored ten runs in the third on its way to a 17-4 victory over Bearden on Friday. Peyton Ingle, Dakota Davison, Collin McKenzie, Kyle Dinkins, Ingle, and Mason Haynes each had RBIs in the frame.

North Webster Knights Varsity pulled away for good with ten runs in the third inning. In the third Ingle singled on the first pitch of the at bat, scoring two runs, Davison drew a walk, scoring one run, Tristan Olvey induced McKenzie to hit into a fielder’s choice, but one run scored, Dinkins singled on a 0-2 count, scoring three runs, an error scored two runs for North Webster Knights Varsity, and Haynes doubled on a 2-2 count, scoring one run.

Davison led the North Webster Knights Varsity to victory on the hill. Davison allowed two hits and two runs over four innings, striking out two and walking one. Dinkins threw one inning in relief out of the bullpen.

McKenzie went 2-for-4 at the plate to lead North Webster Knights Varsity in hits.

Doyline Panthers 13, Spears 0

Noah Spears was brilliant on the hill on Friday, as Spears threw a no-hitter to lead Doyline Panthers Varsity past Stanley 13-0.

Spears led Doyline Panthers Varsity to victory by driving in four runs. Spears went 3-for-3 at the plate. Spears drove in runs on a triple in the first and a single in the third.

Doyline Panthers Varsity got things started in the first inning when Mason Burnett induced Dakota Stewart to hit into a fielder’s choice, but one run scored.

Doyline Panthers Varsity notched four runs in the third inning. Spears and Caysten Mingo powered the big inning with RBIs.

Spears got the win for Doyline Panthers Varsity. The righthander lasted five innings, allowing zero hits and zero runs while striking out six and walking one.

Doyline Panthers Varsity totaled 11 hits in the game. Spears, Cayden Mingo, Mingo, and Austin Arbaugh all managed multiple hits for Doyline Panthers Varsity. Mingo and Spears each collected three hits to lead Doyline Panthers Varsity.

Lakeside 14, Bradley Bears 2

Lakeside Warrior easily dispatched Bradley Bears 14-2 Friday.

Lakeside opened up scoring in the first inning. They scored one run when Bradley Dick doubled.

The Warriors scored seven runs in the fourth inning. Cooper Chase, Cade Boley, Jordan Isbell, Eli Musgraves and Dick all moved runners across the plate with RBIs in the inning.

Dick took the win for Lakeside. The southpaw surrendered two runs on two hits over four innings, striking out four. Boley threw one inning in relief out of the bullpen.

Lakeside collected eight hits on the day. Dick and Isbell each racked up. Multiple hits for the Warriors. Dick went  for 4 at the plate to lead in hits. Dick led with three stolen bases. The Warriors had 10 total stolen bases.

Glenbrook Apaches 6, Sam Houston Broncos 4

Glenbrook Apaches took home a victory over Sam Houston Broncos Friday.

The Apaches got things moving in the first inning. Easton Sanders grounded out, scoring one run.

Sam Houston evened things up at one in the first inning when an error scored one run.

The Apaches pulled away for good with 4 runs in the third inning. Maddox Mandino doubled on the first pitch of the at-bat, scoring one run, Landry Powell singled on a 3-1 count, scoring one run for Glenbrook and Cale Hollis singled on a 3-1 count, scoring one run.

Turner McLelland got the win for Glenbrook. The ace surrendered four runs on three hits over seven innings, striking out three.

The Apaches tallied 10 hits on the day. Mandino, Hollis and Cason Clemons all collected multiple hits. Mandino led with three hits in four at-bats.

Minden Crimson Tide 13, Fluke 3

Minden Crimson Tide Varsity had no trouble on offense today, winning big over Fouke 13-3

Minden Crimson Tide Varsity notched six runs in the fourth inning. Minden Crimson Tide Varsity’s big inning was driven by singles by Landyn Huddleston and Brody Bower and doubles by Andrew Cooper and Elliott Sheppard.

Bower earned the victory on the pitcher’s mound for Minden Crimson Tide Varsity. The righty surrendered three runs on six hits over five innings, striking out eight.

Minden Crimson Tide Varsity totaled 13 hits. Bower, Huddleston, Sheppard, and Price Miller all managed multiple hits for Minden Crimson Tide Varsity. Bower led Minden Crimson Tide Varsity with three hits in four at bats. Minden Crimson Tide Varsity was sure-handed in the field and didn’t commit a single error. Cooper had the most chances in the field with eight.

March 19

Fluke 20, North Webster Knights 13

North Webster Knights Varsity fell behind early and couldn’t come back in a 20-13 loss to Fouke on Saturday. Fouke scored on a error in the first inning, a walk by C Harness in the second inning, a single by D Thorton in the second inning, a double by D McFerrin in the second inning, a single by W Mosle in the second inning, a walk by Harness in the second inning, and a walk by Thorton in the second inning.

Despite the loss, North Webster Knights Varsity did collect 14 hits in the high-scoring affair. Unfortunately, Fouke had 12 hits on the way to victory.

Fouke fired up the offense in the first inning, when an error scored two runs for Fouke.

North Webster Knights Varsity put up nine runs in the fifth inning. The offensive onslaught by North Webster Knights Varsity was led by Mason Haynes, Dakota Davison, Nathan Bernard, Collin McKenzie, Kyle Dinkins, and Cooper Sanders, all driving in runs in the inning.

Fouke scored nine runs in the second inning. Fouke offense in the inning was led by Harness, Thorton, McFerrin, Mosle, Harness, and Thorton, all knocking in runs in the inning.

Peyton Ingle took the loss for North Webster Knights Varsity. The pitcher allowed four hits and eight runs over one inning, striking out one.

North Webster Knights Varsity racked up 14 hits. Sanders, Ingle, Haynes, and McKenzie all had multiple hits for North Webster Knights Varsity. Sanders went 3-for-4 at the plate to lead North Webster Knights Varsity in hits.

Fouke had 12 hits in the game. Thorton, Mosle, and Harness each collected multiple hits for Fouke. Thorton led Fouke with four hits in five at bats.

Glenbrook 7, St. Louis Catholic 6

Glenbrook Apaches defeated St. Louis Catholic Saints Saturday, thanks to a walk-off fielder’s choice. The game was tied at six with Glenbrook batting in the bottom of the seventh when Blake Evans induced Easton Sanders to hit into a fielder’s choice, but one run scored.

The Apaches built a five-run lead in the fifth inning and then held off St. Louis Catholic, who scored five runs in the failed comeback on singles by three of their players.

In the first inning, Glenbrook got their offense started. Turner McLelland’s sac fly scored one fun for the Apaches.

Glenbrook then scored three runs in the fifth inning. The offensive onslaught came from a single by Landry Powell and a. Home run by Garrett Brown.

Cason Clemons took the win for Glenbrook. The fireballer lasted one inning, allowing four hits and five runs while striking out two.

The Apaches hit one home run on the day. Brown went for the long ball in the fifth inning. They totaled eight hits. Brown and Sanders all had multiple hits. Sanders and Brown collected two hits to lead the way.

Minden Crimson Tide 18, Bradley 0

Brandon Winston threw a shutout to lead Minden Crimson Tide Varsity past Bradley 18-0 on Saturday.

Minden Crimson Tide Varsity secured the victory thanks to 14 runs in the first inning. Minden Crimson Tide Varsity’s offense in the inning came from doubles by Andrew Cooper, Elliott Sheppard, Jackson Mayfield, Landyn Huddleston, and Cooper, singles by Brody Bower and Jakobe Jackson, and a walk by Price Miller.

In the first inning, Minden Crimson Tide Varsity got their offense started. Cooper drove in one when Cooper doubled.

One bright spot for Bradley was a single by Janeczko in the second inning.

Winston got the win for Minden Crimson Tide Varsity. The righty went three innings, allowing zero runs on two hits, striking out two and walking one.

Minden Crimson Tide Varsity socked one home run on the day. Jackson had a long ball in the second inning.

Minden Crimson Tide Varsity racked up 19 hits. Sheppard, Cooper, Bower, Jackson, Mayfield, and Winston each managed multiple hits for Minden Crimson Tide Varsity. Jackson, Bower, Cooper, and Sheppard each collected three hits to lead Minden Crimson Tide Varsity. Minden Crimson Tide Varsity was sure-handed in the field and didn’t commit a single error. Bryson Ranger had the most chances in the field with four.

Bradley didn’t commit a single error in the field. Duke had two chances in the field, the most on the team.


Minden’s complex to host some NLFA games

A pair of games at South Bossier Park Saturday officially kicked off the North Louisiana Football Alliance’s 2022 season.

Opening day featured the Lumberjacks taking on the Bombers, followed by a Rattlers versus Roughnecks matchup. Saturday’s contests are part of a 10-week schedule, playoffs included, and will include one bye-week.

Bossier City Mayor Tommy Chandler conducted the coin toss to open the season.

NLFA is a nine-man developmental football league comprised of centrally owned and operated teams. All teams will play their games at one scheduled location within the Ark-La-Tex region during the regular season. The league is the first to attempt to brand nine-man adult tackle football as a professional minor league. 

League President Holland Witherspoon said the NFLA features outstanding athletes who have graduated from high school or junior college but did not have an opportunity to further their playing career at higher levels. Some players from the league have been scouted by arena football teams and added to rosters.

Week two of league play will feature the Bombers versus the Rattlers at 2 p.m. followed by the Lumberjacks and Roughnecks at 4:15. Games will be played at South Bossier Park. Later in the season, games will be played in Minden’s recreational complex to introduce the league to additional fans.


Bricks are foundation of Minden man’s collection

Dan Strange of Minden provided the program during Thursday’s Minden Lions Club meeting. An avid brick collector, Strange educated the Lions on rare bricks, their history, collectibility and composition. He has more than 3,600 bricks in his personal collection. He currently serves as treasurer of the International Brick Collectors Association.

Strange was introduced by Lion Johnny Johnson (seated at right).


Gang arrests stack up

By Bonnie Culverhouse

Minden Police have made the 22nd arrest in their quest to remove members of the TTS (Train to Step) gang off local streets.

Albert Taylor IV, 22, of the 800 block of Woods St., Minden, was taken into custody at Bossier Parish Maximum Security Prison through a warrant for criminal street gangs and patterns of criminal street gang activity.

He is at Bayou Dorcheat Correctional Center on a $50,000 bond.

(Editor’s note: In this case “Step” is slang for approaching someone with the intention of violence, either to fight or shoot.)

This information has been provided by a law enforcement agency as public information. Persons named or shown in photographs or video as suspects in a criminal investigation, or arrested and charged with a crime, have not been convicted of any criminal offense and are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.


Drug dealer off the streets

By Bonnie Culverhouse

With the aid of K9 officer Tigo, Minden Police removed a major drug dealer from local streets last Friday.

Michael Allen Bradley, 40, of the 2400 block of Harveys Barbershop Rd., Dubberly, is charged with possession of methamphetamine with intent to distribute, possession of powder cocaine, 2 counts of possession of oxycodone, possession of alprazolam, possession of drug paraphernalia, improper lane usage and driving under suspension.

Chief Steve Cropper said Lt. Chris Hammontree and Tigo observed Bradley’s vehicle Friday around 8 p.m. as it turned onto Morris Drive from Homer Road.

“The vehicle drove on the double yellow line down Morris Drive, so Lt. Hammontree initiated a traffic stop,” Cropper said. “The driver, Bradley, could not produce a driver’s license nor proof of insurance or registration.”

Cropper said Hammontree recognized Bradley as someone he had arrested for drug violations in December 2021.

“Bradley’s body language was concealing in nature,” said the chief. “When Lt. Hammontree ran his license, he found it was suspended.”

When Off. Jason Smith reportedly arrived on scene, the officers removed Bradley from the vehicle. He was then asked to call a licensed driver to take control of it.

“When Lt. Hammontree asked for consent to search the vehicle, Bradley denied it,” Cropper said. “While Off. Smith walked Bradley to the front of the patrol unit, Hammontree retrieved K9 Tigo from his patrol vehicle. Tigo alerted to the presence of illegal narcotics in the vehicle.”

After brief questioning, Bradley reportedly told officers there was a small amount of marijuana, a half gram of methamphetamine and a meth pipe in the front seat.

During a search of the vehicle, officers reportedly located a total of 13.92 grams of methamphetamine in several baggies, 11.82 grams of marijuana in two bags, 1.92 grams of powder cocaine in two baggies, two oxycodone/acetaminophen pills, one oxycodone hydrochloride 30 mg pill, one alprazolam pill, a used needle, two meth pipes, one THC wax pipe, a digital scale and a push rod.

An unknown substance was reportedly sent to the lab for testing.

“Bradley’s boss showed up to get the vehicle, but when he saw Bradley was getting arrested for drugs, he left the scene,” Cropper said.

This information has been provided by a law enforcement agency as public information. Persons named or shown in photographs or video as suspects in a criminal investigation, or arrested and charged with a crime, have not been convicted of any criminal offense and are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.


Arrest Reports 

March 17

Jessica Ann Vollmer, 33, of the 400 block of Hwy. 802, Sarepta, was arrested by Webster Parish Sheriff’s deputies on a warrant issued by Louisiana State Police for insurance fraud. She also had 2 warrants for issuing worthless checks.

March 19

Dequandelyn T. Adams, 44, of the 1400 block of S. Gum St., Minden, was arrested by WPSO for worthless checks and improper supervision of a minor.

Teadrien Ramone Burris, 24, of the 800 block of Peach St., Minden, was arrested by Minden Police for resisting an officer with false ID.

Dustin Douglas McLemore, 36, of the 2900 block of hwy. 163, Doyline, was arrested by WPSO for attempted theft and resisting an officer.

Sabra Shavon Woodruff, 38, of Gainesville, Texas, was arrested by Sarepta police as a fugitive from Texas.

March 20

Charlene Annette Mills, 46, of the 800 block of Carolina St., Minden, was arrested by MPD on a bench warrant for driving under suspension and a bench warrant for no child restraint.

Domion C. Parker, 19, of Texarkana, Texas, was arrested by Louisiana State Police for hit and run, driving while intoxicated (first offense) and careless operation of a motor vehicle.

Dontrell Dawayne Talley, 28, of the 800 block of Fincher Rd., Minden, was arrested by MPD for resisting an officer, possession of methamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia.

Timothy M. Grim, 52, of the 300 block of Lee St., Minden, was arrested by MPD for obscenity.

Dion Larenzo Brooks, 50, of Homer, was arrested by WPSO for possession of marijuana, possession of methamphetamine, 2 counts of resisting by force, fugitive from Homer PD.

March 21

Simon Sertuche, 22, of Hot Springs, Ark., was arrested by WPSO in Hot Springs and returned to Bayou Dorcheat Correctional Center on a charge of contempt of court.

This information has been provided by a law enforcement agency as public information. Persons named or shown in photographs or video as suspects in a criminal investigation, or arrested and charged with a crime, have not been convicted of any criminal offense and are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.


Jones class learns about fairness

Ms. Winkler’s 2nd Grade Class at J.L. Jones Elementary School had a great Community Circle discussion Thursday on fairness. The students played a quick St. Patrick’s Day game over the intercom and when her class was not one of the winners, they were all complaining that it “wasn’t fair.”

Ms. Winkler read them a short story about fairness, then she asked them about a time they had gotten hurt. The first student said that he had once hurt his finger, so she gave him a bandaid to put on his finger. The next one said they had hurt their head, and she gave them a bandaid and had them put it on their finger too. Each child talked about a time they had gotten hurt, and she made them all put a bandaid on their finger. 

Then she asked them if that was fair- they all got a bandaid for their finger. They said yes, it was fair. She then asked them if it was what they needed. So they had a discussion about how fairness doesn’t always mean you get what you want or need. They took this picture to remind them of that lesson.


UCAP Needs for the week of March 21

United Christian Assistance Program has the following needs for this week:

Food: powdered milk, crackers, cornbread mix, biscuit mix

Household goods: king and queen sheets, towels

Clothing: men’s socks, men’s pants and jeans (32 & 34 waist), men’s tennis shoes (sizes 9 – 10 1/2)

Thank you for supporting UCAP.

UCAP is open  from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays for food, utility and rent assistance. Clothing is dispensed on Wednesdays only.


Upcoming Events 

March 26

9 a.m. until 1 p.m., NWHS Baseball Mini-Camp at NWHS baseball field on Stateline Rd. Deadline to register: March 18. Call or text 318-578-2359.

6 p.m. The Perrys at CAC Building, Springhill.

March 29

10 a.m. until 2 p.m. Job and Career Expo at NLTCC, 9500 Industrial Dr., Minden.

March 31

6:30 p.m. “Be the Calm in the Chaos,” A discussion on serving those who are suffering, sponsored by WHO of North Webster, Springhill Medical Center and First Baptist Church of Springhill. The event will be held at FBC, Springhill. Speaker: Morgan Grantham.

April 2

10 a.m. until 2 p.m. Wings & Wheels Fly-In & Car Show at Minden Airport.

April 4-7

8:30 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. school bus driver training course for Webster Parish Schools. Site is Harper Pathway to Excellence Center, 618 Germantown Rd., Minden. For more information, call 318-377-7052 for Jeff Franklin.

April 5

Greater Minden chamber’s Annual Awards Gala, celebrating 80 years. Presented by Minden Medical Center.

April 15-17

Spring Highway 80 sale between Minden and Dixie Inn.

April 21

10 a.m. until 1 p.m., Senior Fun Day for ages 50 and older. Vendor booths, games, door prizes. Springhill CAC Building. Sponsored by Springhill Medical Center. Free admission; free lunch sponsored by Regional Hospice.

April 23

Piney Hills Master Gardeners Annual Green Thumb Jamboree. Plant sale, vendors, food truck and activities for the kids. Vendors of all kinds contact Marilyn Bunton at 318-299-0137

April 30 & May 1

7 a.m. both days, Minden Evening Lions Club will be hosting a garage sale fundraiser at the Minden Fairgrounds field. They are taking donations now if you have anything you’d like to contribute to help them raise funds you can contact Sherrie McMurray at 294-6346, Dru Brown at 272-2467 or Tommy McMurray. 

May 7

9 a.m. until 4 p.m. Tradition with a Twist Quilt Show presented by Piney Needles Quilt Guild. South Main Mall, Springhill. Free admission.

  • If you have a non-profit event: church, school or community, please email it to wpjnewsla@gmail.com.* Webster Parish Journal reserves the right to determine if a calendar item is a paid advertisement.

Notice of Death – March 21, 2022 

Peggy Joyce Beaird Poole

Oct. 26, 1942 – March 18, 2022

Visitation: 5 until 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 22, 2022, Bailey Funeral Home, Springhill

Funeral service: 1 p.m. Wednesday, March 23, 2022, Bailey Funeral Home, Springhill

Burial: Liberty Baptist Cemetery, Spearsville

Martha Jane Gardner Gahagan

Sept. 30, 1934 – March 18, 2022

Visitation: 10 a.m. Wednesday, March 23, 2022 at First Baptist Church, Coushatta

Funeral service: immediately following visitation at 11 a.m.

Burial: Social Springs Cemetery

** Webster Parish Journal posts paid obituaries – unlimited words and a photo, as well as unlimited access – $80. Contact your funeral provider or wpjnewsla@gmail.com . Must be paid in advance of publication. (Above death notices are free of charge.)


Heflin man, wife who perish in house fire identified

By Paige Nash

David John Snyder, 74 perished in a house fire Saturday, and his wife, 74-year-old Bobbie Lou Snyder died from her injuries Sunday.

 Heflin Volunteer Fire Department and crews from Bienville Fire Districts 4 and 5 were dispatched to the home located in the 100 block of S. Church Street around 4 p.m.

Two other occupants were home at the time of the fire. Snyder’s wife and their daughter, Diana Sue Snyder, 54 were airlifted to Ocshner/LSU Health System with severe burns. Bobbie Lou Snyder received burns covering 65 percent of her body. The daughter is in stable condition.

Snyder was handicapped and missing both of his legs.

“I want to emphasize how much of a hero my granddad was,” Brianna Lewis said. “He told his daughter to get his wife out instead of him. He wanted to make sure my grandmother was out of the house first.”

Robert Stachowicz, a volunteer with the Heflin Fire Department was injured on the scene and transported to a Shreveport hospital for treatment, as well.

“When he arrived at the house, one of the occupants that had escaped was lying too close to the fire and Robert went to move her,” Heflin Fire Chief Stewart Beatty said. “He suffered minor burns on his hands but will make a full recovery.”

The State Fire Marshal’s Office was on the scene until almost 10 p.m. Saturday. Following a thorough investigation, the cause of the fire is currently undetermined.

A GoFundMe account has been created to assist the family during this time:  GoFundMe-Click Here